A study by researchers from Texas A&M University’s Department of Soil and Crop Sciences and Department of Nutrition dives into the potential of sorghum as a solution to some of the global nutrition challenges posed by climate change.

Study explores sorghum opportunities and challenges for global nutrition

A study by researchers from Texas A&M University’s Department of Soil and Crop Sciences and Department of Nutrition dives into the potential of sorghum as a solution to some of the global nutrition challenges posed by climate change.

Sorghum stands out for its resilience in harsh environmental conditions, making it an attractive option for agriculture in a changing climate. 

From a nutritional perspective, sorghum offers several advantages over other major cereal crops like wheat, rice, and corn. Its starch composition, rich in slowly digestible and resistant starches, can help regulate blood sugar levels and potentially reduce the risk of conditions like diabetes. 

Additionally, sorghum contains various bioactive compounds such as polyphenols, which have been linked to a lower risk of chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease and certain cancers.

Despite these benefits, there are obstacles to using sorghum as a food 

ingredient. Its endosperm functionality is lower and its protein digestibility is relatively poor due to the cross-linking tendency of the sorghum endosperm protein kafirin during processing. 

However, recent advancements in traditional genetics have shown promise in improving the structure and functionality of kafirin protein, leading to enhanced food quality and protein digestibility in sorghum.

This study highlights the emerging opportunities and challenges associated with utilizing sorghum as a nutritious and climate-resilient food ingredient, suggesting that further research and development could unlock its full potential.

The Global Collaboration on Sorghum and Millet is working to support the growth and development of the global sorghum value chain, improve digestibility, and expand the production and use of climate-smart crops.

Read the full report from Texas A&M.